Survey Reveals IoT Security is Falling Short

Trustlook has released the findings from an IoT security survey it sent in September 2017. Some responses validated existing beliefs, while others were troubling in terms of how the IoT is secured and understood. For instance, 54 percent of IoT device owners do not use a third-party security tool to protect their devices from outside threats. In addition, more than one-third (35 percent) do not change the default password on their devices, leaving them vulnerable to attacks.

The proliferation of IoT devices in 2017 has been staggering, with 8.4 billion devices currently in use, and a total of 25 billion devices projected by 2020. As the use of these devices continues to increase, so do the associated risks. By 2020, it is estimated that 25% of cyber attacks will target IoT devices.

In the past year, there have been a few notable IoT attacks. In August 2017, hackers were able to gain root access to a vulnerable Amazon Echo and add commands that secretly capture the raw microphone input. And last Fall’s Mirai botnet, which targeted IoT devices, shut down a large part of the Internet.

Some of the findings from the survey include:
▪ 41% own an IoT device, such as a smart refrigerator or fitness tracker
▪ 54% of IoT device owners do not use a third-party security tool
▪ 35% of IoT device owners do not change their default password
▪ 17% know of Mirai, the IoT botnet from Fall 2016 that shut down parts of the Internet
▪ 22% know that there will be 25 billion IoT devices by the year 2020

To view an infographic of the survey findings, please go here. For more information on Trustlook, please visit http://www.trustlook.com.

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